Adding eq mid cycle

Page 6: “The distribution of known adjustments is not symmetric — adjustments are more likely to be negative than positive. The most common reason for a station needing adjustment is a site move in the 1940-60 period. The earlier site tends to have been warmer than the later one — as the move is often to an out of town airport. So the adjustments are mainly negative, because the earlier record (in the town/city) needs to be reduced [Jones et al., 1985, Jones et al., 1986]. Although a real effect, this asymmetry is small compared with the typical adjustment, and is difficult to quantify; so the homogenisation adjustment uncertainties are treated as being symmetric about zero.

The equalizer is definitely the most important piece of equipment in your audio rack! Most transceivers do an excellent job of passing all the midrange frequencies between 300Hz ~ usually with an added dominance between 500Hz ~ 800Hz. Unfortunately, most stock transmitters roll-off the bass frequencies below about 150Hz and down, as well as the high frequencies above about and up. So, we need to do basically three things:

* Reduce the Midrange
* Increase the Bass
* Increase the Treble

Taking a look once again at GRAPH 1 and GRAPH 2 above, you can see what an EQ can accomplish when set up. Below is a graphical representation of what EQing I had to implement in order to get some flatness out of my Kenwood TS-850S/DSP-100 after passing through its . and DSP filtering.

Adding eq mid cycle

adding eq mid cycle

Media:

adding eq mid cycle