Haldol decanoate deltoid

The selected site is cleansed with an antimicrobial and is allowed to dry. It is injected with the dominant hand using a quick, darting motion perpendicular to the patient's body at an angle between 72 and 90 degrees, as a faster injection is less painful. The needle is then stabilized with the nondominant hand while the dominant hand slides to the plunger to slowly instill the medication, as a rapid injection causes more discomfort. The CDC does not recommend the outdated practice of aspirating for blood to rule out injecting into a blood vessel. The needle is withdrawn at the same angle inserted. Using the "Z track" or zigzag technique is recommended, where the skin is pulled and held down to one side with the nondominant hand about an inch and after the needle is withdrawn the displaced skin is allowed to return to its normal position. This is to ensure that the medication does not leak back along the needle track. Gentle pressure is applied with a gauze but the site is not massaged to prevent forcing the medication into subcutaneous tissue. [5]

There are no well controlled studies with HALDOL (haloperidol) in pregnant women. There are reports, however, of cases of limb malformations observed following maternal use of HALDOL along with other drugs which have suspected teratogenic potential during the first trimester of pregnancy. Causal relationships were not established in these cases. Since such experience does not exclude the possibility of fetal damage due to HALDOL, this drug should be used during pregnancy or in women likely to become pregnant only if the benefit clearly justifies a potential risk to the fetus. Infants should not be nursed during drug treatment.

Haldol decanoate deltoid

haldol decanoate deltoid

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