How is low testosterone tested

The High starch high glucose diet is another important cause of low testosterone. It s one of the reason that low testosterone is a strong predictor of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. There is a vicious circle of the High starch diet, such as proposed by most fast food outlets and T2DM, Obesity, Low Testosterone, Brain Atrophy, Hyperglycaemia, heart disease, neuropathies, and even depression. A first thing any police officer should do is to minimize starchy foods in the diet. Digestible starches (amylose and amylopectin) are pure glucose, they are glucose polymer chains. We don’t need carbohydrates to survive, they are an economic luxury of low-cost/high-energy foods but with very little nutrient density, fruits having the most nutrients, and starches the lowest, amongst carbohydrate rich foods (Starches, flours from cereals, score the lowest of all other foods in terms of nutrient density). They were incorporated in the human diets at the beginning of the agricultural organization when humans shifted from a nomadic way of life to a sedentary one some 12,000 years ago. They were appreciated because of their low-cost/high-energy density…not because of their nutrient density. With leafy greens, who are very low-energy/high-nutrient density, their carbohydrate content are mostly fibers (non digestible saccharides, or other complex saccharides). In fact, excessive starchy diets also have a strong chelating effect, this means that the natural chelators (such as phytic acid) found in cereal grains attract nutritional metals such as iron, copper, zinc, etc…a deficiency in zinc is an etiological characteristic of Type 2 Diabetes. This is the reason Food programs sponsored by the UN which usually are based on enriched flours are treated with anti-chelating agents such as phytase, the enzyme that neutralises phytate (also called phytic acid) ( http:///content/130/2/+html ). But the common flours used in the human North American diets are not. before the fast food revolution, North Americans consumed on average less than 10% of starches in their diets. This average is now 25%, and this is the root cause of the metabolic syndrome, diabetes and obesity epidemics, all conditions where low testosterone is a strong marker.

For both men and women, an alternative to testosterone replacement is low-dose clomifene treatment, which can stimulate the body to naturally increase hormone levels while avoiding infertility and other side effects that can result from direct hormone replacement therapy. [17] This therapy has only been shown helpful for men with secondary hypogonadism. Recent studies have shown it can be safe and effective monotherapy for up to 2 years in patients with intact testicular function and impaired function of the HPTA( http:///ijir/journal/v15/n3/full/ ). Clomifene blocks estrogen from binding to some estrogen receptors in the hypothalamus, thereby causing an increased release gNRH and subsequently LH from the pituitary. Clomifene is a Selective Estrogen Reuptake Modulator (SERM). Generally clomifene does not have adverse effects at the doses used for this purpose. Clomifene at much higher doses is used to induce ovulation and has significant adverse effects in such a setting.

How is low testosterone tested

how is low testosterone tested

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