Testosterone forms

In males with delayed puberty: Various dosage regimens have been used; some call for lower dosages initially with gradual increases as puberty progresses, with or without a decrease to maintenance levels. Other regimens call for higher dosage to induce pubertal changes and lower dosage for maintenance after puberty. The chronological and skeletal ages must be taken into consideration, both in determining the initial dose and in adjusting the dose. Dosage is within the range of 50 to 200 mg every 2 to 4 weeks for a limited duration, for example, 4 to 6 months. X-rays should be taken at appropriate intervals to determine the amount of bone maturation and skeletal development (see  INDICATIONS AND USAGE and WARNINGS ).

Fluid and electrolyte disturbances: Retention of sodium, chloride, water, potassium, calcium, and inorganic phosphates.
 
Gastrointestinal: Nausea, cholestatic jaundice, alterations in liver function tests, rarely hepatocellular neoplasms and peliosis hepatis (see WARNINGS ).
 
Hematologic: Suppression of clotting factors II, V, VII, and X, bleeding in patients on concomitant anticoagulant therapy, and polycythemia.
 
Nervous system: Increased or decreased libido, headache, anxiety, depression, and generalized paresthesia.
 
Allergic: Hypersensitivity, including skin manifestations and anaphylactoid reactions.
 
Vascular Disorders: venous thromboembolism

Miscellaneous: Inflammation and pain at the site of intramuscular injection.

Testosterone forms

testosterone forms

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